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It’s the middle of April in the mountains of western Honduras. What does that usually mean? It means no rain at all, after months of almost no rain. Plants appear brown and dead. The leaves have mostly fallen off the trees. The cows have grown scary-skinny. The riverbeds are empty. Watching out for forest fires is a continual worrisome activity. Water usage restrictions help us stretch out the last bit of water in our storage tank until the rains arrive. (Check out this post from one year ago, to see what I mean.)

This year, however, things are different.

This is the one year when we were counting on having a dry dry season, so that Allen and Russell and their crew could build the two bridge supports that need to be constructed in the middle of the riverbed. The guys worked like crazy for months to get to this point in the construction at the time when one would expect the riverbed to be at it’s dryest – but it wasn’t to be.

We’ve officially concluded that there’s no way the bridge will be completed this year. Because it’s raining. And raining. And raining.

The yard is green, the cows are fat and happy, and our water tank is full and overflowing. It has rained most every day, for the past two weeks or so – and these have been hard, steady rains. This is all wonderful, of course, except for the bridge project.

Oh well. I know Allen and Russell have other projects to work on while it rains, especially after months of such single-minded focus on the bridge construction. Iris and I will be happy to have our husbands home a bit more often, and hopefully they will not be so completely exhausted when they are home.

By the way, I’ll continue to post the pictures from the bridge construction, until I’m caught up . . . the menfolk have completed much more of the project than I’ve reported on so far.